Breakfast, Treats & Snacks, Vegan &/or Raw

Cold Brew Coffee over ice

If Shakespeare was reincarnated, this would be it. Cold Brew Coffee.

Make it immediately. Today. Now. For wellness junkies, you can offset the caffeine indulgence with a field of kale later. Or try this cold brew cacao instead.

Cold brew is simply an easy way of making coffee concentrate. Instead of relying on heat to extract the flavour from the coffee beans, you’ll be relying on a full moon and pheromones. I leave mine overnight in the fridge, after an interactive chorus of AC/DC’s Thunderstruck. In the morning, all that’s left to do is strain and serve over ice. It’s enough to incite poetry in a three-toed onglet.

 

Because the coffee beans do not socialise with intense heat, the result is a smoother, lighter, sweeter kava with an unexpected smack of hard rock.

One final FYI; cold brew coffee is bodaciously good with macadamia nutmilk. Just soak 100g of maca nuts in water for two hours. Ditch the soak water, and spin in a blender with 250ml of fresh water or cold brew coffee. Strain through your cheesecloth, chill in the fridge, and summon when required.

 

Cold Brew Coffee

4-8 servings

1 litre cold filtered water

220g coffee beans

1 nutmilk bag or cheesecloth

 

 

1 Roughly grind your coffee beans to a super-coarse crumb.

2 In a tall Kilner jar, or French Press, add the filtered water to your coarse coffee beans. I like to make a ceremony out of it. The soundtrack to Star Wars is not inappropriate.

3 Seal with a lid. If using a French Press, don’t push down – just ensure no oxygen sneaks in through the spout. Leave the beans to fraternise with the filtered water in the fridge overnight, or for up to 24 hours (the sweet spot).

4 When the brew is ready, strain twice through a nut milk bag or cheesecloth (or plunge the French Press). The double filtration ensures every last scrap of silt disappears. Compost the coffee beans, or use them in the shower as a bodyscrub mixed up with olive oil.

5 Refrigerate your cold brew coffee for up to 6 days. Serve with an audience, over ice. Or use this recipe for hazelnut milk, using 2 cups of water in place of 3 cups of water.

 

 

 

Events, Uncategorized

Finally! My blog is smartphone compatible …

Ta dahhhhh!

About a decade late, but my website is now mobile and tablet compatible. If you’re reading this from your smartphone email, pop on over and say hullo!

Plus, you’ll notice my site got a fancy reskinning.

 

 

In other news, if you struggle to feed your family healthy food, take a look at my last Instagram post. There’s an awe-inspiring murmuration of savvy mums sharing tips on how to sneak veggies onto kid’s dinner plates. Genius. One of my favourites in the thread is frozen cauliflower into smoothies – it blends up like creamy frozen banana.

Happy weekending.

x SJ

 

 

Events

How to Spot a Health & Wellness Junkie

Don’t forget that laughter is one of life’s greatest and simplest of superfoods!

Plant-powered pixie or coffee coyote; here’s wishing your kitchen indecent amounts of giddiness and joy.

x SJ


photo credit Jo Murphy for Roost Books

How to Spot a Health & Wellness Junkie

1. Your bowel movements are practically Instagrammable.

2. You can name 27 uses for coconut oil, faster than immediately.

3. Honestly, you think Gwyneth Paltrow is a good actor.

4. You’ve had therapy on your solar plexus.

5. Raw fennel is your go-to snack on playdates. Harib0 is homicide.

6. You’ve stocked up on jade eggs for your Yoni.

7. Traffic jams are an opportunity to catch up on kegal exercises.

8. Dairy is evil. You’re certain that burrata is the bastard child of a Mexican tortilla and a Korean fungus.

9. Cold pressed parsley juice makes you feel like you could live forever. And if you don’t? You’ll die trying.

10. You can fix constipation with your ujjayi breath.

11. Your cleaning products are so pure, you can probably eat them.

12. You’ve made your own gut-healing, vegan, gluten-free marshmallows and made your colleagues eat them.

13. Your children say Namaste instead of thank you.

14. You’re not passive aggressive about other people’s food choices. Much.

15. Most restaurants don’t understand you. Even waiters trigger your IBS.

Breakfast

The Brew: COUGH AND COLD REMEDY

Carrageen is an Atlantic seaweed available in trendy supermarkets across Ireland. Californian hipsteratti like to call it Irish moss, and use it to set vegan desserts in place of verboten animal gelatin. So it’s not surprising that, when boiled, carrageen has an Angel Delight texture to salve achy throats. My little ones think this Cough and Cold Dynamite is a jelly dessert, administered from a spoon. Granted, their taste buds are probably shot when they’re fighting a cold.

It’s unclear whether the antimicrobial effect is from the raw honey, vinegar, turmeric, ginger or wild carrageen. There’s evidence to suggest that each of these sonic ingredients harbour their own deadly ninja moves. Not that I care much, so long as my cough is fixed.

Treating yourself with your mind is also a great recipe. If the placebo effect can account for up to a 48 per cent improvement in symptoms during some clinical trials, it’s not unfair to suggest that our minds are in fact the best superfood du jour. Such a state of affairs can really ruin a coffee break at a medical conference.

The idea that your brain can stimulate healing is hardly new. But it’s certainly worth remembering our brain’s currency in the healing process. If our emotional selves can help convince our physical selves that a fake treatment is the real thing — the placebo effect — just think of the amazing benefits and possibilities we all hold for our future wellness. Wish yourselves well, my friends!

The Brew

Makes 2 mugs

Carrageen is a type of Irish mossy seaweed available in loads of Irish supermarkets like Supervalu, and certainly in all good health stores.

  • Roughly 20g packet of Carrageen moss
  • 3-4 cloves
  • 2 tablespoons raw honey
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar or fresh lemon

Optional add-ons

  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • Crack of black pepper
  • Other citrus fruits
  • 1 teaspoon minced turmeric root, or dried turmeric

1. Soak the carrageen in water for 30 minutes to rehydrate it. Remove, discard liquid, and rinse under the cold tap. Boil the carrageen in a large saucepan with the cloves and around 750ml of fresh water. Secure a lid on it.

2. After 20-30 minutes, strain the “ocean veg” brew and allow the liquid to cool to lip temperature before stirring in the remaining ingredients and optional add-ons.

3. The brew will set like lemon curd once cooled. If (or when) this happens, gently re-heat. If your cough is particularly chesty, make several batches with added ginger zest and sip all day, with the aid of a couple of Woody Allens.

For kids:

Add extra honey, making sure it’s locally sourced. Administer by the spoon to help with their bark! A few teaspoons a day is plenty. Not suitable for babies.